Ablade Glover Achieves New Auction Record, Enwonwu’s Christine Sells for £1.1 Million at Sotheby’s and More News

18 Friday October 2019
ART WORLD

ABLADE GLOVER ACHIEVES NEW AUCTION RECORD, ENWONWU’S CHRISTINE SELLS FOR £1.1 MILLION AT SOTHEBY’S. The Sotheby’s Modern and Contemporary African Art Auction in London on Tuesday witnessed a number of new records, with strong performances for works by Mohamed Melehi (Moroccan, b.1936) and Cristiano Mangovo (Angolan, b.1982), which rose way beyond their upper estimates. Other highlights include two works by Uzo Ugonu (Nigerian, 1931-1996) sold for £43,750 and £40,000—double their pre-sale estimates, and Sudanese-born Hussein Shariffe broke his auction record twice. [ArtWa]

OPEN CALL FOR HENRIKE GROHS ART AWARD 2020. This art prize, established in memory of former Head of Goethe-Institut, Abidjan, Henrike Grohs who died in a terrorist attack in Côte d’Ivoire in March 2013, aims to support emerging artists in their careers, thus responding to the challenges of practicing on the African continent. Applications are opened until 15 November 2019 and young artists who live and work on the African continent are invited to apply. The prize will be awarded at Dak’Art in May 2020. [TSA]

WHY DO WE NEED AN ART FAIR DEDICATED TO AFRICAN ART? Will African contemporary art need to be viewed in isolation as it becomes more mainstream? From 1-54 London 2019, Touria El Glaoui, Azu Nwagbogu, Kristin Hjellegjerde and other gallerists comment on the need or otherwise for a specialised fair dedicated to art from the African continent. [Harper’s Bazaar]

TOLA OJUOLAPE, THE DESIGNER BEHIND THE LOUNGE AT 1-54 LONDON 2019. Ojuolape talks about being inspired by Chief Nike Okundaye, Yinka Shonibare, and the Adire as the source for her Lounge project, which includes display of Nigerian batik and Indigo dyes cloths fluctuating from the ceiling of the communal lounge in the heart of the fair. [1-54 Fair]

MORE THAN 100 ACADEMICS PETITION GERMANY TO OPEN ITS COLONIAL-ERA COLLECTIONS TO RESEARCHERS. In a public letter published yesterday, a distinguished group of academics, artists, and museum professionals have published a passionate open letter demanding that German museums open up their inventories so that research into colonial-era objects can effectively begin. [Artnet]

 

Ngozi Schommers, Self Portrait, 2018, perforated paper on watercolour paper 100x150cm. Courtesy of the artist.
Ngozi Schommers, Self Portrait, 2018, perforated paper on watercolour paper 100x150cm. Courtesy of the artist.

EXHIBITIONS: EDITOR’S PICKS

NGOZI SCHOMMERS PRESENTS ‘THE WAY WE MASK’ AT NATIONAL MUSEUM, LAGOS. In her second solo exhibition, Schommers returns to memories of time passed to look at how hair shapes the identity of Africans. “We began with a photograph of stylish women in wigs. How could they know that their image would have a place in this future, that their simple pose would inspire the markings and makings of a daughter yet-to-be-born?” the curator Wura-Natasha Ogunji writes in the curatorial statement. The exhibition opens on 2 November through 14 November 2019. [Press Release]

TINGATINGA, OTHER LEGENDARY TANZANIA ARTISTS AT NAIROBI GALLERY. Original works by Edward Saidi Tingatinga (1932-1972), his disciples, and a dozen other Tanzanian artists, including George Lilanga, will be exhibited at the second phase of the exhibition ‘Legendary Artists of Tanzania’ opening on 21 October 2019. Tingatinga was a bicycle repairer turned artist, who developed a distinctive style of painting using enamel bicycle paint on ceiling board. His art career lasted only four year; he was shot dead at the age of 40. [Business Daily]

Reena Saini Kallat's "Woven Chronicle," as seen installed at the Museum of Modern Art, will be included in the ICA's exhibition. Courtesy Jonathan Muzikar/The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY.
Reena Saini Kallat’s “Woven Chronicle,” as seen installed at the Museum of Modern Art, will be included in the ICA’s exhibition. Courtesy Jonathan Muzikar/The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY.

HAPPENING ELSEWHERE

KELANI ABASS, OLUMIDE ONADIPE, SANAA GATEJA, TYNA ADEBOWALE AT HOGAN LOVELLS, LONDON. In acknowledgement of Black History Month, the international law firm, Hogan Lovells is hosting the exhibition ‘No Room for Fear’ from 1 – 30 October 2019. The exhibition showcasing works various artists with intertwined cultural roots spreading across Britain and Europe to Nigeria, Ghana, Uganda, Sierra Leone, Zimbabwe, and Jamaica is co-curated by SMO Contemporary Art and the Black British Female Artists Collective. [SMO]

YINKA SHONIBARE AND OTHER ARTISTS EXPLORE THE MIGRATION EXPERIENCE AT ICA. The group exhibition, ‘When Home Won’t Let You Stay: Migration through Contemporary Art’ considers how contemporary artists are responding to the migration, immigration, and displacement of peoples today. Borrowing its title from a poem by Warsan Shire, Somali-British poet who gives voice to the experiences of refugees, the exhibition features artworks made since 2000 by 20 artists from more than a dozen countries. It will be on view at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston from 23 October 2019 through 26 January 2020. [WBUR]

 

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